Artery of Bernasconi and Cassinari

Dr Henry Knipe and Dr Peter Fawzy et al.

The artery of Bernasconi and Cassinari, also known as medial or marginal tentorial artery (of Bernasconi–Cassinari), commonly arises from the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery.

The artery of Bernasconi and Cassinari is ~2 cm long and is an important branch of the meningohypophyseal trunk, originating from the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery.

It is usually a single trunk, supplying the meninges of the tentorium cerebelli, and often supplies the oculomotor, trochlear, and abducens nerves

    Due to its small size, the artery of Bernasconi and Cassinari is poorly visualized on angiography in the absence of pathologically increased blood flow. When seen, it has a wavy appearance on angiography.

    It was first described by Bernasconi and Cassinari in the setting of tentorial meningiomas.

    Lesions arising from the tentorium cerebelli, such as tentorial dural arteriovenous fistulas may derive arterial blood supply from the artery of Bernasconi and Cassinari. 

    The artery of Bernasconi and Cassinari is also the most likely artery to be enlarged on an angiogram in tentorial meningiomas.

    Occasionally, it may provide essential collateral blood flow to the posterior circulation. 

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    Article information

    rID: 66545
    Section: Anatomy
    Synonyms or Alternate Spellings:
    • Marginal tentorial artery of Bernasconi–Cassinari
    • Artery of Bernasconi-Cassinari
    • Recurrent artery of Bernasconi and Cassinari
    • Medial tentorial artery of Bernasconi–Cassinari

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