Items tagged “exam”

36 results found
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Adult chest radiograph in the exam setting

A chest radiograph in the exam setting may contain a vast variety of pathology. However, consider the history and correlate the likely diagnoses that may be demonstrated on film. Furthermore, check your review areas to ensure that the abnormality isn't at the corner of the film. Locating pathol...
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Anterior mediastinal mass in the exam

Getting a film with an anterior mediastinal mass in the exam is one of the many exam set-pieces that can be prepared for. The film goes up and after a couple of seconds pause, you need to start talking: CXR There is a left sided mediastinal mass that makes obtuse angles with the mediastinal c...
Article

Exam set-pieces

Exam set-pieces refer to those cases that can be considered likely to turn up in the exam setting and can be prepared for. In the oral exam, having a prepared "speech" for these set-pieces allows the candidate to focus less on the stress of describing what is in front of them and more on conside...
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Viva technique

Viva technique is hugely important when sitting oral examinations. You must remember that the examiners may well have been examining for several days and for hours at a time. They will have shown their films many times and will know them backwards! Moreover, their films will be beloved, so do no...
Article

Posterior mediastinal mass in the exam

Getting a film with a posterior mediastinal mass in the exam is one of the many exam set-pieces that can be prepared for.  Description On this frontal chest radiograph, there is a soft-tissue density mass adjacent to the right upper mediastinum with thickening of the right paravertebral stripe...
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Miliary nodules in the exam

Getting a film with miliary nodules in the exam is one of the many exam set-pieces that can be prepared for. The film goes up and after a couple of seconds pause, you need to start talking: Chest radiograph There are multiple tiny soft-tissue density nodules present throughout both lungs with...
Article

Right upper lobe collapse in the exam

Getting a film with right upper lobe collapse in the exam is one of the many exam set-pieces that can be prepared for. Description There is increased opacification in the right upper zone with associated volume loss - rib spacing is reduced, midline structures displaced to the right and the ri...
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Pneumothorax in the exam

Getting a film with a pneumothorax in the exam is one of the many exam set-pieces that can be prepared for.   It is unlikely that they will give you a simple pneumothorax - so, it is worth while considering the likely causes and whether it is under tension. Miss it at your peril (both in real l...
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Kerley lines in the exam

Getting a film with Kerley lines in the exam is one of the many exam set-pieces that can be prepared for. The film goes up and after a couple of seconds pause, you need to start talking: CXR There are bilateral basal interstitial lines that extend to the pleural surface - these are septal (Ke...
Article

FRCR examination

The FRCR examination is set by the Royal College of Radiologists in the UK and consists of three parts: First FRCR: physics and anatomy Final FRCR Part A: specialty-specific module examinations Final FRCR Part B: long cases, rapid-reporting and viva voce examinations Colloquially First FRCR ...
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FRCR 2B exam

The FRCR 2B exam is the final part of the FRCR examination.  Candidates must have passed the FRCR 2A exam and have at least three years clinical training in radiology. The examination is in three parts with written and oral components: FRCR 2B rapid-reporting (written) FRCR 2B long cases (wr...
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FRCR 2B rapid-reporting

The FRCR 2B rapid-reporting component of the FRCR part 2B is the final part of the FRCR examination.  It aims to assess the candidate's ability to accurately detect abnormalities in the type of plain films usually seen in a standard reporting pile.  Thus, it generally consists of chest and appen...
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Ankle radiograph (checklist)

The ankle radiograph checklist is just one of the many pathology checklists that can be used when reporting to ensure that you always actively exclude pathology that is commonly missed; this is particularly helpful in the examination setting, e.g. the FRCR 2B rapid-reporting. Radiograph The ma...
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Pathology checklists

Pathology checklists are really helpful when reporting a radiograph, ultrasound or cross-sectional examination. It is a key way to ensure that you fully review a film and don't fall foul of satisfaction of search. Plain film radiographs craniofacial skull radiograph checklist facial bones ra...
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Neonatal chest radiograph in the exam setting

The neonatal chest radiograph in the exam setting may strike fear into the heart of many radiology registrars, but it need not! There are only a limited number of diagnoses that will be presented on such films and they are often highlighted by the history. Gestation First of all, have a look ...
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Chest radiograph in the exam setting

A chest radiograph in the exam setting is something that is almost certainly going to play a large part in a radiology registrars training. It is worth thinking of chest radiographs broken down by patient age: adult chest radiograph in the exam setting pediatric chest radiograph in the exam s...
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Adult chest radiograph set-pieces

There are a number of adult chest radiograph set-pieces. These are based on common patterns of disease that are seen on chest radiographs. Make sure that you have relevant differentials for these appearances and a quick aural set-piece for them when they come up. Pulmonary parenchyma lobar col...
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Adult chest radiograph common exam pathology

Adult chest radiograph common exam pathology is essential to consider in the build up to radiology exams. The list of potential diagnoses is apparently endless, but there are some favorites that seem to appear with more frequency. When dealing with the adult chest radiograph in the exam setting...
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Correct chest radiograph terminology

Correct chest radiograph terminology is very helpful when describing pathology. It is especially important when describing findings to colleagues (radiologist or not), who may not be able to see the image in front of them, e.g. over the phone, or when describing an image in a radiology exam. Te...
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Adult chest radiograph pathology checklist

The adult chest radiograph pathology checklist is just a pathology checklist of things not to miss when reviewing a chest radiograph, especially in the exam setting. standard review areas apices retrocardiac area hilar regions below the diaphragm right descending pulmonary artery (like a l...

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